I finally got my first build complete, mostly. My high G string broke as I was tuning it up. As a guitarist, it's nothing new to have a string break every now and then, so I still make due for now.

Anyway, here's my unnamed geetar, feel free to drop a name for it down in the comments if y'all'd like.

Started with an empty cigar box and a 1"x2"x3' slab of poplar, salvaged some copper piping from an old house my dad and myself had to fix, ordered some strings, some fretwire, and a fretting template, and in about 14 hours worth of labor, out came a geetar.

For anybody who is reading this that hasn't built a git yet, don't fret it. (Horrible joke, I know and apologize).

But seriously, It's really simple when you really get into it. Have fun making it, and don't stress about it. I had fun throughout the entirety of my project, even though I stressed majorly about making a fretboard, and once I made the fretboard, I realized it wasn't worth stressing over. It was super simple, easy, and fun.

Anyway, enough rambling.

Thanks to all the people who have given me their advice in the build, you've all helped me a ton, and without all'a y'all, I probably wouldn't have been able to figure all this stuff out and actually build a git.

Oh, and one more thing. I see why you all call this "Madness". Everything that's box shaped that I see now is already turning into a git in my head, and truth be told, I love it.

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  • Roland - a couple quick thoughts and suggestions.  I've never seen this done, but you could put some screws between the bridge and tailstock to pull the strings over into better alignment (like on your headstock).  It should not negatively affect playing or the sound, as the only string length you really care about is the free length between the nut and bridge.  Helps to compensate for the shift in your neck, and is also pretty unique!   Hope this makes sense!

    I swap out bridges all the time!  I agree that the copper tube might not be ideal for transmitting vibrations to the box.  I've used pre-made bridges, bolts and scrap pieces of wood.  It's more a matter of tuning the bridge to the guitar, either for the appearance you want or to best produce the sound.

    Sound holes can help; but they can be very simple.  Cool ones add to the beauty of the CBG, but a 5/8" or larger hole or holes can also work.  I think they contribute to the volume of the instrument, but don't expect huge gains in sound level.  Part of it is - they're cool!

    Congrats on your first build!  Lots of info is available here, as you know.  You have a very solid start!  Looking forward to your next, and your next, and your next......

    • Thank you! As I said to someone previously, I fully intend on making an antler bridge with correct spacing and such for my next build. In fact, I already have two blanks for some.

      And for sound holes, I have some really good looking F hole templates that I just need to measure out, mark, and cut. 

      And for the idea of screws for the strings at the tail-end, I like the idea but the box I currently have is too thin, and I fear I might split it. But I might just integrate that into one of my future builds!

    • Hi, if it was me I would not fix anything to the top that's going to affect the tops vibration, as thats where the sound comes from.

      Cheers Taff

    • Hi, as this is not a tapered fingerboard the strings are the same spacing all the way up, so maybe they do not need fixing in place. The spacing at the tail piece would be the same as the nut.

      if you want the strings to better follow the neck, move the tail piece over. This will also remove any side pull on the neck, that could cause issues down the track. Just info for future builds.

      cheers Taff

    • Much appreciated! Hopefully the neck-cant won't be an issue on the next build. And thats the only reason string alignment was (and still kinda is) such a problem. The only reason it is the way it is on this one is that I got a bit excited and mismarked my drilling point on the neck. But ya live and ya learn, trial and error has always been a big thing in my life.

  • Hey Ronald, I like it! How does it sound? That is the most important thing I think. You can always work out your "small" imperfections on the next one. Honestly I like it! Super happy you fretted it. :-) 

    • Currently not all that great since I'm tuned an entire step down and having to use a capo to get to open G, but beyond that its great, and I'm very excited for the next one!

    • It may sound better with a more solid bridge Roland, one with a larger footprint on the top, made of hardwood. Might be worth a try. That copper tube may be absorbing string energy instead of transmitting it to the top. Another observation is you have no sound hole. A lot of the sound would be trapped in the box. Soundholes are an important part of the sound producing chain.

      cheers Taff

    • Yep yep, already working on the sound holes, just gotta get over to my equipment to be able to cut them out since I finally have good templates. And as for the bridge, I fully intend to do an antler bridge on my next actual cigar box-bodied guitar. This one was primarily sticking my toes in to test the water. There are too many issues with this first one to even think about addressing them all, but as I said, the next will be exponentially better.

       

    • canted neck is not big deal, some folks made ones with a deliberately really canted neck, the question of the day is how playable is it? 

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